Protected: The Toxin Connection

Protected: The Toxin Connection

Publication No. 2  Major Production: In-Depth Special Report  Title: “The Toxin Connection: The Impact of Rubber Production on Health in Northeast Ohio”  Principal Investigator: Lamb, Yanick Rice  Synopsis “The Toxin Connection” is an interactive series examining occupational and environmental health in an industrial community as part of a Social Justice Investigative Journalism Fellowship. The focus is on the generational impact of toxins that have resulted in elevated levels of cancer and auto-immune diseases. Multimedia will include photos, video, data visualization and mapping. I have been conducting in-depth interviews with patients, physicians, researchers, environmentalists and politicians as well as health, public policy, industry and public officials who essentially gave corporations a pass by maintaining low regulatory standards.  Impact/Recognition This is an under-reported environmental and medical story. The goal of “The Toxin Connection” is to provide public service journalism by answering questions long on the minds of local residents who have endured decades of silence and indifference like in Flint, Michigan. My investigation would sort through myths and facts; dig into the data and other research to highlight why disease rates are so high; discuss genomics; and delve into allegations of political inaction, and corporate influence or suppression of possible health risks. I would examine health care over the years, environmental monitoring historically, and the status and impact of legislation, including the Toxic Substances Control Act. My project has been accepted for publication in Belt Magazine and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. I was awarded a $8,800 grant from the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University and the Fund for Investigative Journalism, which includes representatives from leading news organizations such as the Chicago...
Coverage of Affordable Care Act

Coverage of Affordable Care Act

Publication No. 21 Research and Reporting on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act  Role Researcher, reporter and photographer Impact This collection of research and reporting on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is noteworthy because of the historic nature and importance of health reform as well as the vital need to enhance understanding and awareness among citizens, regardless of their stance. These articles brought much-needed attention to unreported and underreported aspects of health reform. They also provided customized content relevant to African Americans. They are an outgrowth of my initial coverage of the inaugural three-day arguments at U.S. Supreme Court and later challenges there. In both cases, I was one of just a few African-American journalists credentialed to cover the proceedings. My work has appeared in a variety of publications and websites before, during and after the hearings, which have also been highlighted in my classes at Howard University as well as with high school students in the Urban Health Media Project under our $300,000 Kellogg grant. My research and preparation also included participation in a National Press Foundation webinar, seminars sponsored by the Association of Health Care Journalists and Kaiser Health News, along with a White House town hall and briefings with the Secretary of Health and other cabinet members. I conducted some of the reporting with support from the Journalists in Aging Fellows Program, a project of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA)  and New America Media, with funding from the Silver Century Foundation. The components of this compilation have had widespread distribution, including: BlackAmericaWeb.com, the companion site for the Tom Joyner Morning Show, the No. 1...
FierceforBlackWomen.com

FierceforBlackWomen.com

Publication No. 1 Creative Works Media Production: Web Development Title: FierceforBlackWomen.com  Co-Principal Investigator and Co-founder: Lamb, Yanick Rice Contribution I’ve been involved in research and development of a digital network that addresses health disparities by targeting African-American women age 35 and older. The core of the network is a health and wellness website,FierceforBlackWomen.com, which is supplemented by face-to-face interaction, social media and eventually customized apps. Fierce also puts us at the forefront of digital media entrepreneurship at a time when African Americans are woefully under-represented and overlooked. Synopsis When it comes to health and many other areas, women are the decision makers and influencers. Healthy women mean healthy families and healthy communities. Fierce is an exciting, digital network that fills a void in the media landscape by helping busy, dynamic black women in the prime of their lives be healthy, fit and fabulous. Fiercehelps women and their families break the cycle of health disparities, which is literally a matter of life or death in many cases. Impact/Recognition FierceforBlackWomen.com is revolutionary because women’s magazines and websites tend to focus disproportionately on beauty, fashion and entertainment. In this youth-obsessed world, they are also lacking in content and images featuring black women who are 35 and older. My co-founder and I bring years of trust and experience in health journalism from publications ranging from Essenceand Heart & Soulto Healthand Scientific American. For years, women have been begging us to develop the equivalent of a “black Moremagazine.” (Morefocused primarily on white women over 40.) No other media outlets offer the in-depth, journalistic analysis on health and well-being that Fierce provides, along with consistent access...
Media Production: Dealing With Dementia

Media Production: Dealing With Dementia

Publication No. 3 Creative Work: Media Production Title: Dealing With Dementia, November 2014 Principal Investigator: Lamb, Yanick Rice  Published by TheRoot.com and the PBS site NextAvenue.org published the project as well as New America Media and FierceforBlackWomen.com, which ran a longer version. Lamb was a year-long John A. Hartford/MetLife Foundation Journalism in Aging & Health Fellow, a project of New America Media and the Gerontological Society of America. She was also an Alzheimer’s Disease Fellow through the National Press Foundation. Synopsis As the 2013 John A. Hartford/MetLife Foundation Journalism in Aging & Health Fellow, I spent a year researching Alzheimer’s disease, other forms of dementia and caregiving. Changes in the brain can cause dementia, severely impairing mental abilities including memory, movement, reasoning and thoughts. African-American women and men are two to three times more likely to develop dementia than white Americans. After extensively interviewing several people with dementia, caregivers and medical experts, I found the perfect family to profile right here in Washington — a single man caring for his 83-year-old mother. He was also a rarity. Only a third of caregivers are men, according to a study by the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP. Men are less likely to be the main or only person in this role. They’re less likely to be involved with personal care and more likely to pay for it. In addition to presenting a different face of caregiving, this family helped to illustrated the commonalities that affect everyone as well as the unique attributes of African Americans, who are 65% more likely to be primary caregivers than other groups. Impact/Recognition New America Media, a coalition of 3,000 ethnic news organizations, provided oversight, peer review and editing...